Lead Product Designer - NYT Beta (Film & TV) - The New York Times





DesignerUnspecified03/09/2015The New York TimesNew York City, New York, United StatesUX SkillsDesignHTMLCSS3+ years of design experience (previous mobile work is a huge plus). Able to provide samples of work that show complex and creative UX solutions, exceptional visual design and solid information architecture. Advanced knowledge of HTML and CSS techniques (both current and future).. Love giving and receiving honest, thoughtful feedback. Believe that product and design decisions are inextricably linked. Enjoy shipping small, quick experiments to validate your ideas and opinions. Unafraid to have your opinion changed. Communicate design effectively, regardless of the audience (engineers, PMs, executives, other designers, etc.). Comfortable, and even excited about, working outside your comfort zone. Unafraid to learn new things to tackle a problem. Has an established, repeatable and shareable design process that encourages collaboration between other designers and product teams. A passion for film and TV is a plusProduct Designers own design and UX for NYT Beta, and collaborate with Product, Engineering, and Design teams to deliver clean and consistent user experiences for our readers. NYT Digital Product Design team is responsible for wearing many hats at once: from high-level product thinking, to interaction flows, mockups, and quick prototyping. We work with and across every team at The Times, Product, Engineering, Research, Business, Operations and Marketing–to develop and ship a meaningful, cohesive experience. This position is based in New York, NY. About the Job: As a Product Designer at The Times, you’ll be expected to tackle our most difficult user experience problems. We’ll look to you to be strong contributor to your team, elevating your fellow designers’ work with thoughtful critique, both online and in-person, and in groups and one-on-one. You will be expected to think holistically and encourage your teams and fellow designers to think beyond what they’re building. On the design side, you will need a good sense for when to apply established patterns and styles, as well as when to evolve them or leave them behind entirely (while updating our style guide and documentation accordingly). You’ll identify and help correct product inconsistencies, on both the visual and experience sides.Applyhttp://www.nytimes.com/Yes